Real McCoy Customer Appreciation Sale


Saturday, April 1, 2017
Madison County Fairgrounds, London, OH
Pigs Sift: 12 PM :: Sale: 4 PM
Sifter: Scott Evans, OH
Auctioneer: Kevin Wendt
NSR Rep: Blaine Evans
Click Here for Entry Form & More Information

FALL FUTURITY SHOW

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16TH
Madison County Fairgrounds, London, OH
Click Here for more information

Real McCoy & Shipley Genetics Customer Appreciation Sale

mccoy-fb-customersale
Saturday, April 2, 2016

Madison County Fairgrounds, London, OH
Pigs Sift: 12 PM :: Sale: 5 PM
Sifter: Seth Keplingler, OH
Auctioneer: Kevin Wendt
NSR Rep: Blaine Evans
All pigs must be sires by Real McCoy or Shipley boars to be eligible for entry into this sale
Click Here for Entry Form & More Information

Facing PEDV On Our Own Terms :: Day 10

BREAKING WITH PEDV ON OUR OWN TERMS

Up to this point we have been very fortunate to make it through the winter farrowing season without breaking with PEDv.

However, it has become apparent that it is highly unlikely that we will be able to avoid a break through the spring sale season. After visiting with veterinarians and other producers who have broke with PEDv, we have decided to voluntarily infect our entire herd (sows, boars, nurseries, and grower) with PEDv. We have come to a point where we feel it is important to minimize our potential damage from the virus by infecting the herd at a time when we can minimize death loss in baby pigs and recover and come clean before the peak of spring pig sales and semen sales.

Over the next 3 or 4 weeks we will keep an open public journal of what we are doing, what we are seeing/experiencing, and how we are recovering. We will keep you posted.

Tuesday, March 11
All diarrhea is gone. All stools were normal. All hogs had regained normal activity levels. Pigs in nurseries and show barns looked like they were rehydrated and had recovered to near normal bloom for their stages of maturity. The youngest pigs at just over 3 weeks old still looked a little rough. Healthy but a little rough. Tuesday was also the day that we penned sows that were 3 days out from farrowing. This will be the real test of whether our timing was right for getting ahead of PEDv. We will know soon.

Facing PEDV On Our Own Terms :: Day 9

BREAKING WITH PEDV ON OUR OWN TERMS

Up to this point we have been very fortunate to make it through the winter farrowing season without breaking with PEDv.

However, it has become apparent that it is highly unlikely that we will be able to avoid a break through the spring sale season. After visiting with veterinarians and other producers who have broke with PEDv, we have decided to voluntarily infect our entire herd (sows, boars, nurseries, and grower) with PEDv. We have come to a point where we feel it is important to minimize our potential damage from the virus by infecting the herd at a time when we can minimize death loss in baby pigs and recover and come clean before the peak of spring pig sales and semen sales.

Over the next 3 or 4 weeks we will keep an open public journal of what we are doing, what we are seeing/experiencing, and how we are recovering. We will keep you posted.

Monday, March 10
Everything looked like they were back on track. Nurseries looked significantly better in terms of bloom and fill. Their consumption had really accelerated. The stool consistency was basically normal in all phases of the operation. All sows and boars were acting normal during feeding time. We decided to change up our medication in our meditators in the nurseries and show barns to cover against any other bugs that the pigs may have picked up while their immune systems were compromised. We chose to use Oxytetrecycline (Pennox 343) at 800 mg/gallon.

Facing PEDV On Our Own Terms :: Day 8

BREAKING WITH PEDV ON OUR OWN TERMS

Up to this point we have been very fortunate to make it through the winter farrowing season without breaking with PEDv.

However, it has become apparent that it is highly unlikely that we will be able to avoid a break through the spring sale season. After visiting with veterinarians and other producers who have broke with PEDv, we have decided to voluntarily infect our entire herd (sows, boars, nurseries, and grower) with PEDv. We have come to a point where we feel it is important to minimize our potential damage from the virus by infecting the herd at a time when we can minimize death loss in baby pigs and recover and come clean before the peak of spring pig sales and semen sales.

Over the next 3 or 4 weeks we will keep an open public journal of what we are doing, what we are seeing/experiencing, and how we are recovering. We will keep you posted.

Sunday, March 9
Nearly the entire herd was back to acting normal and stool consistency was near normal. The only ones that still had diarrhea were the individuals that weren’t infected until the second attempt on day 6. Nurseries were starting to recover some of the bloom lost during the peak of diarrhea and dehydration.

Facing PEDV On Our Own Terms :: Day 7

BREAKING WITH PEDV ON OUR OWN TERMS

Up to this point we have been very fortunate to make it through the winter farrowing season without breaking with PEDv.

However, it has become apparent that it is highly unlikely that we will be able to avoid a break through the spring sale season. After visiting with veterinarians and other producers who have broke with PEDv, we have decided to voluntarily infect our entire herd (sows, boars, nurseries, and grower) with PEDv. We have come to a point where we feel it is important to minimize our potential damage from the virus by infecting the herd at a time when we can minimize death loss in baby pigs and recover and come clean before the peak of spring pig sales and semen sales.

Over the next 3 or 4 weeks we will keep an open public journal of what we are doing, what we are seeing/experiencing, and how we are recovering. We will keep you posted.

Saturday, March 8
Nearly all sows and boars that had not broke with diarrhea began to have PEDv symptoms by mid-day. The additional attempt to infect the day before had worked. Nurseries still looked a bit rough but the pigs were all acting near normal. The majority of sows and boars were back to normal appetite.

Facing PEDV On Our Own Terms :: Day 6

BREAKING WITH PEDV ON OUR OWN TERMS

Up to this point we have been very fortunate to make it through the winter farrowing season without breaking with PEDv.

However, it has become apparent that it is highly unlikely that we will be able to avoid a break through the spring sale season. After visiting with veterinarians and other producers who have broke with PEDv, we have decided to voluntarily infect our entire herd (sows, boars, nurseries, and grower) with PEDv. We have come to a point where we feel it is important to minimize our potential damage from the virus by infecting the herd at a time when we can minimize death loss in baby pigs and recover and come clean before the peak of spring pig sales and semen sales.

Over the next 3 or 4 weeks we will keep an open public journal of what we are doing, what we are seeing/experiencing, and how we are recovering. We will keep you posted.

Friday, March 7
Friday we decided it was important to make sure that any hogs that had not shown symptoms of PEDv were exposed one more time. We then mixed feces with water and sprayed the diluted feces on top of the feed in the boar barns, nurseries and show barns (as we did on day 2 and 3). By day 6 most sows and boars were consuming feed and acting normal. The pigs in the nurseries had mostly regained their vigor and feed consumption was increasing but they looked a bit rough to say the least.

Facing PEDV On Our Own Terms :: Day 5

BREAKING WITH PEDV ON OUR OWN TERMS

Up to this point we have been very fortunate to make it through the winter farrowing season without breaking with PEDv.

However, it has become apparent that it is highly unlikely that we will be able to avoid a break through the spring sale season. After visiting with veterinarians and other producers who have broke with PEDv, we have decided to voluntarily infect our entire herd (sows, boars, nurseries, and grower) with PEDv. We have come to a point where we feel it is important to minimize our potential damage from the virus by infecting the herd at a time when we can minimize death loss in baby pigs and recover and come clean before the peak of spring pig sales and semen sales.

Over the next 3 or 4 weeks we will keep an open public journal of what we are doing, what we are seeing/experiencing, and how we are recovering. We will keep you posted.

Thursday, March 6
At this point it appeared that nearly the entire herd was infected. The pigs in the nursery were all infected. There were 5 new sow with diarrhea and in the boar stud 6 new boars showed the same symptoms. However there were about 8-10 sows and 8 boars that acted like they had not at all been infected. On the plus side, a substantial part of the sows that had been very sluggish over the 2-3 days prior had regained their appetite (even though they still had diarrhea).

Facing PEDV On Our Own Terms :: Day 4

BREAKING WITH PEDV ON OUR OWN TERMS

Up to this point we have been very fortunate to make it through the winter farrowing season without breaking with PEDv.

However, it has become apparent that it is highly unlikely that we will be able to avoid a break through the spring sale season. After visiting with veterinarians and other producers who have broke with PEDv, we have decided to voluntarily infect our entire herd (sows, boars, nurseries, and grower) with PEDv. We have come to a point where we feel it is important to minimize our potential damage from the virus by infecting the herd at a time when we can minimize death loss in baby pigs and recover and come clean before the peak of spring pig sales and semen sales.

Over the next 3 or 4 weeks we will keep an open public journal of what we are doing, what we are seeing/experiencing, and how we are recovering. We will keep you posted.

Wednesday, March 5
The sow herd was closer to 80% infection. Some pens of sows had virtually no appetite yet some sows who had diarrhea 2 days earlier were acting much more lively and consuming feed. PEDv had become much more rampant in nurseries and show barns. Most pigs in these barns were up and lively even though they had diarrhea. A small percentage (around 5%) were super sluggish.

Boars also began to show signs of discomfort and decreased appetite. A couple boars vomited, but no diarrhea. It looked like we were close to the peak of infection for the entire herd.